Tag Archives: puzzle

Independent Set Puzzles

In this post, I want to return to the idea of NP-Complete problems. There is a more technical, more formal definition that I can refer you to, but I like to refer to the images from Garey and Johnson’s “Computers and Intractability: A Guide to the Theory of NP Completeness”. The images helps to understand the difficulty of NP-Complete problems by presenting two images. The first image shows a single individual speaking to someone saying that he has been unable to solve the problem. The second image shows that same individual speaking to the same person behind the desk, but saying that not only was he unable to solve the problem but neither was a long line of people. The theory of NP Complete problems revolves around the concept that if an efficient algorithm exists for an NP-Complete problem, then an efficient algorithm exists for all problems in the class NP.

Today, I would like to present a puzzle I created to play with the Independent Set problem. This is the problem where we are given a graph G = (V, E) and are asked to find a maximum set of vertices S such that there is no edge in the graph G between any two vertices in S. The decision version (the problem asking whether there is an independent set of size k) of this problem is NP-Complete, so the known algorithms for problem either have a slow running time, or do not solve it exactly.

This problem is very related to another puzzle I posted last year called the clique problem. In fact, Karp originally proved that Clique was NP-Complete by showing that if Clique could be solved efficiently, then Independent Set could be solved efficiently. He did this by constructing a second graph [G bar], called the compliment of G (containing the same vertices in G, along with the edges that are not present in G. Any edge present in G will not be present in ). Then he showed that the nodes representing a maximum clique in G would represent a maximum independent set in . He had already shown that Independent Set was NP-Complete, which meant that both Independent Set and Clique were among the most difficult problems within the class known as NP.

The puzzle begins with an undirected graph and asks users to find a maximum independent set. Users should click on the numbers in the table below the graph indicating the nodes they wish to select in their independent set (purple indicates that the node is selected, gray indicates that it is not). Once a user have a potential solution, they can press the “Check” button to see if their solution is optimal. If a user is having trouble and simply wishes to see the maximum independent set, they can press the “Solve” button. And to generate a new problem, users can press the “New Problem” button.As a result of this relationship between the Clique problem and the Independent Set problem, the Bron-Kerbosch algorithm that was used to find maximum cliques previously can also be used here.

Clique Problem Puzzles

I still remember how I felt when I was first introduced to NP-Complete problems. Unlike the material I had learned up to that point, there seemed to be such mystery and intrigue and opportunity surrounding these problems. To use the example from Garey and Johnson’s book “Computers and Intractability: A Guide to the Theory of NP Completeness”, these were problems that not just one researcher found difficult, but that a number of researchers had been unable to find efficient algorithms to solve them. So what they did was show that the problems all had a special relationship with one another, and thus through this relationship if someone were to discover an algorithm to efficiently solve any one of these problems they would be able to efficiently solve all the problems in this class. This immediately got my mind working into a world where I, as a college student, would discover such an algorithm and be mentioned with the heavyweights of computer science like Lovelace, Babbage, Church, Turing, Cook, Karp and Dean.

Unfortunately I was a student so I did not have as much time to devote to this task as I would have liked. In my spare time though I would try to look at problems and see what kind of structure I found. One of my favorite problems was, The Clique Problem. This is a problem where we are given an undirected graph and seek to find a maximum subset of nodes in this graph that all have edges between them, i.e. a clique (Actually the NP-Complete version of this problem takes as input an undirected graph G and an integer k and asks if there is a clique in G of size k).

Although I now am more of the mindset that there do not exist efficient algorithms to solve NP-Complete problems, I thought it would be a nice project to see if I could re-create this feeling – both in myself and others. So I decided to write a program that generates a random undirected graph and asks users to try to find a maximum clique. To test users answers, I coded up an algorithm that works pretty well on smaller graphs, the Bron-Kerbosch Algorithm. This algorithm uses backtracking to find all maximal cliques, which then allows us to sort them by size and determine the largest.

Users should click on the numbers in the table below the canvas indicating the nodes they wish to select in their clique (purple indicates that the node is selected, gray indicates that it is not). Once they have a potential solution, they can press the “Check” button to see if their solution is optimal. If a user is having trouble and simply wishes to see the maximum clique, they can press the “Solve” button. And to generate a new problem, users can press the “New Problem” button.

So I hope users have fun with the clique problem puzzles, and who knows maybe someone will discover an algorithm that efficiently solves this problem and become world famous.

Unidirectional TSP Puzzles

As we’ve entered the late spring into early summer season, I’ve found myself wanting to go out more to sit and enjoy the weather. One of these days recently I sat in the park with a good book. On this occurrence, I decided not to go with a novel as I had just finished “Incarceron“, “The Archer’s Tale“, and “14 Stones” – all of which were good reads, but I felt like taking a break from the novels.

Just as a side note, 14 Stones is a free book available on smashwords.com and I’ve now read about 6 books from smashwords.com and haven’t been disappointed yet. My favorite is still probably “The Hero’s Chamber” because of the imagery of the book, but there are some well written ebooks available there by some good up and coming writers for a reasonable price, with some being free.

 

So with the desire to read, but not being in the mood for novels I decided to pick up one of my non-text but still educational books that make me think. This day it was “Programming Challenges“. I browsed through the book until I found one that I could lay back, look at the water, and think about how to solve it.

 

The programming puzzle the peaked my interest was called “Unidirectional TSP”. We are given a grid with m rows and n columns, with each cell showing the cost of using that cell. The user is allowed to begin in any cell in the first column and is asked to reach any cell in the last column using some minimum cost path. There is an additional constraint that once a cell is selected in a column, a cell in the next column can only be chosen from the row directly above, the same row, or the row directly below. There is a javascript version of this puzzle available here.

Fundamentally, the problem is asking for a path of shortest length. Many shortest length problems have a greedy structure, but this one gained my interest because the greedy solution is not always optimal in this case. So I took a moment to figure out the strategy behind these problems. Once I had that solution, I decided that it would be a good program to write up as a puzzle.

 

In this puzzle version, users will click the cells they wish to travel in each column in which case they will turn green (clicking again will turn them white again). Once the user clicks on a cell in the last column, they will be notified of whether or not they have chosen the minimum path. Or if users are unable to solve a puzzle, the “Solution” button can be pressed to show the optimal path and its cost. 

Triangle Sum Puzzle

This is probably a consequence of being a mathematician, but I have always enjoyed number puzzles. I think that there is a general simplicity and universality in numbers that are not present in things like word puzzles, where the ability to reach a solution can be limited to the vocabulary of the user.

The fact that these are puzzles and not simply homework exercises also helps because we often find people sharing difficulties and successes stories over the water cooler or at the lunch table. The fact that many of these math puzzles can teach some of the same concepts as homework problems (in a more fun and inclusive way) is generally lost on the user as their primary interest is generally on solving the puzzle in front of them, or sometimes solving the more general form of the puzzle.

Today’s post is about a puzzle that was originally shared with me over a lunch table by a friend who thought it was an interesting problem and asked what I thought about it. I didn’t give the puzzle much further thought (he had correctly solved the puzzle) until I saw it again in “Algorithmic Puzzles” by Anany Levitin and Maria Levitin. It was then that I thought about the more general form of the puzzle, derived a solution for the problem, and decided to code it up as a script for my site.

Below is a link to the puzzle:

We have a set of random numbers arranged in a triangle and the question is to find the path of maximum sum from the root node (the top node) to the base (one of the nodes on the bottom row) with the rules that
(1) Exactly one number must be selected from each row
(2) A number can only be selected from a row if (a) it is the root node or (b) one of the two nodes above it has been selected.

For the sample
So for the sample problem in the picture, the maximal path would go through nodes 57, 99, 34, 95, and 27.

For more of these puzzles check out the script I write here and be sure to let me know what you think.

The Bridge Crossing Problem

Most puzzles are fun in their own right. Some puzzles are so fun that they have the added benefit that they are likely to come up in unexpected places, like maybe in a job interview. I was recently reading a paper by Günter Rote entitled “Crossing the Bridge at Night” where Rote analyzes such a puzzle. Upon finishing the paper, I decided to write a script so that users could see the general form of this puzzle.

The problem can be stated as follows: There is a set of people, lets make the set finite by saying that there are exactly n people, who wish to cross a bridge at night. There are a few restrictions that make crossing this bridge somewhat complicated.

  • Each person has a travel time across the bridge.
  • No more than two people can cross the bridge at one time.
  • If two people are on the bridge together, they must travel at the pace of the slower person.
  • There is only one flashlight and no party (of one or two people) can travel across the bridge without the flashlight.
  • The flashlight cannot be thrown across the bridge, and nobody can go to the store to purchase another flashlight

The image above shows the optimal solution when the 4 people have travel times of 1, 2, 5, and 10. The script I have written allows users to work with different numbers of people with random travel times. Give it a try and see if you can spot the patterns in the solution.