Tag Archives: node

Floyd-Warshall Shortest Paths

The Floyd Warshall algorithm is an all pairs shortest paths algorithm. This can be contrasted with algorithms like Dijkstra’s which give the shortest paths from a single node to all other nodes in the graph.

Floyd Warshall’s algorithm works by considering first the edge set of the graph. This is the set of all paths of the graph through one edge. Node pairs that are connected to one another through an edge will have their shortest path set to the length of that edge, while all other node pairs will have their shortest path set to infinity. The program then runs through every triplet of nodes (i, j, k) and checks if the path from i to k and the path from k to j is shorter than the current path from i to j. If so, then the distance and the path is updated.

So lets consider an example on the graph in the image above. The edge set of this graph is E = {(0, 1), (0, 2), (0, 3), (1, 3), (3, 4)}. So our initial table is:

  0 1 2 3 4
0 inf (0, 1) (0, 2) (0, 3) inf
1 (0, 1) inf inf (1, 3) inf
2 (0, 2) inf inf inf inf
3 (0, 3) (1, 3) inf inf (3, 4)
4 inf inf inf (3, 4) inf

As we look to update the paths, we first look for routes that go through node 0:

Because node 0 connects to both node 1 and node 2, but node 1 does not connect to node 2, we have the following truth holding in the matrix above:
cost(0, 1) + cost(0, 2) < cost(1, 2), so we can update the shortest path from node 1 to node 2 to be (1, 0, 2).

Because node 0 connects to both node 2 and node 3, but node 2 does not connect to node 3, we have the following truth holding in the matrix above:
cost(0, 2) + cost(0, 3) < cost(2, 3), so we can update the shortest path from node 2 to node 3 to be (2, 0, 3).

Because node 3 connects to both node 0 and node 4, but node 0 does not connect to node 4, we have the following truth holding in the matrix above:
cost(0, 3) + cost(3, 4) < cost(0, 4), so we can update the shortest path from node 0 to node 4 to be (0, 3, 4).

Because node 3 connects to both node 1 and node 4, but node 1 does not connect to node 4, we have the following truth holding in the matrix above:
cost(1, 3) + cost(3, 4) < cost(1, 4), so we can update the shortest path from node 1 to node 4 to be (1, 3, 4).

Because node 3 connects to both node 2 and node 4, but node 2 does not connect to node 4, we have the following truth now holding:
cost(2, 3) + cost(3, 4) < cost(2, 4), so we can update the shortest path from node 2 to node 4 to be (2, 0, 3, 4).

The final table giving the list of shortest paths from every node to every other node is given below.

  0 1 2 3 4
0 inf (0, 1) (0, 2) (0, 3) (0, 3, 4)
1 (0, 1) inf (1, 0, 2) (1, 3) (1, 3, 4)
2 (0, 2) (1, 0, 2) inf (2, 0, 3) (2, 0, 3, 4)
3 (0, 3) (1, 3) (2, 0, 3) inf (3, 4)
4 (0, 3, 4) (1, 3, 4) (2, 0, 3, 4) (3, 4) inf

To see more examples and to help answer questions, check out the script in my examples section on the Floyd-Warshall algorithm

Topological Sort

One of the things I generally say about myself is that I love learning. I can spend hours upon hours reading papers and algorithms to better understand a topic. Some of these topics are stand alone segments that I can understand in one sitting. Sometimes, however, there is a need to read up on some preliminary work in order to fully understand a concept.

Lets say that I was interested in organizing this information into a new course. The order I present these topics is very important. Knowing which topics depend on one another allows me to use the topological sorting algorithm to determine an ordering for the topics that respects the preliminary work.

The input for the topoligical sorting algorithm is a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG). This is a set of relationships between pairs of topics, where if topic 1 must be understood before topic 2, we would add the relationship (topic 1, topic 2) to the graph. DAGs can be visualized by a set of nodes (points) representing the topics. Relationships like the one above (topic 1, topic 2) can then represented by a directed arc originating at topic 1 and flowing in the direction of topic 2. We say that the graph is “Acyclic” because there cannot be a cycle in the topic preliminaries. This amounts to us saying that a topic cannot be a prerequisite for itself. An example of a DAG is shown in the image above.

With the topics represented as a DAG, the topologial ordering algorithm works by searching the set of nodes for the one with no arcs coming into it. This node (or these nodes is multiple are present) represents the topic that can be covered next without losing understanding of the material. Such a node is guaranteed to exist by the acyclic property of the DAG. Once the node is selected, we can remove this node as well as all arcs that originate at this node from the DAG. The algorithm then repeats the procedure of searching for a nod with no arcs coming into it. This process repeats until there are no remaining nodes from which to choose.

Now lets see how the topological sort algorithm works on the graph above. We will first need to count the in-degree (the number of arcs coming into) each node.

Node | Indegree
—————-
0 | 2
1 | 2
2 | 0
3 | 2
4 | 2
5 | 2
6 | 0
7 | 2
8 | 3

Node to be removed (i.e. node with the minimum indegree): Node 2.
Arcs connected to node 2: (2, 5), (2, 3)
Resulting Indegree Count:
Node | Indegree
—————-
0 | 2
1 | 2
3 | 1
4 | 2
5 | 1
6 | 0
7 | 2
8 | 3

Node to be removed: Node 6:
Arcs connected to node 6: (6, 1), (6, 3), (6, 4), (6, 5), (6, 7), (6, 8)
Resulting Indegree Count:
Node | Indegree
—————-
0 | 2
1 | 1
3 | 0
4 | 1
5 | 0
7 | 1
8 | 2

Node to be removed: Node 3
Arcs connected to node 3: (3, 0), (3, 8)
Resulting Indegree Count:
Node | Indegree
—————-
0 | 1
1 | 1
4 | 1
5 | 0
7 | 1
8 | 1

Node to be removed: Node 5
Arcs connected to node 5: (5, 0), (5, 8)
Resulting Indegree Count:
Node | Indegree
—————-
0 | 0
1 | 1
4 | 1
7 | 1
8 | 0

Node to be removed: Node 0:
Arcs connected to node 0: (0, 1), (0, 4)
Resulting Indegree Count:
Node | Indegree
—————-
1 | 0
4 | 0
7 | 1
8 | 0

Node to be removed: Node 1
Arcs connected to node 1: none
Resulting Indegree Count:
Node | Indegree
—————-
4 | 0
7 | 1
8 | 0

Node to be removed: Node 4
Arcs connected to node 4: none
Resulting Indegree Count:
Node | Indegree
—————-
7 | 1
8 | 0

Node to be removed: Node 8
Arcs connected to node 8: (8, 7)
Resulting Indegree Count:
Node | Indegree
—————-
7 | 0

Node to be removed: Node 7
Arcs connected to node 7: none
Resulting Indegree Count:
Node | Indegree
—————-

Since there are no nodes remaining, we have arrived at a topological ordering. Going through this iteration, we can see that we arrived at the ordering (2, 6, 3, 5, 0, 1, 4, 8, 7). There were several occasions where there were multiple nodes with indegree of 0 and we could have selected an alternative node. This would have given us a different topological ordering of the nodes, but it would still be valid.

There are more learning opportunities and an interactive demonstration of the algorithm at Topological Sort Examples at LEARNINGlover.

The Depth-First-Search Algorithm

I remember when I was younger I used to play the game of hide-and-seek a lot. This is a game where a group of people (at least two) separate into a group of hiders and a group of seekers. The most common version of this that I’ve seen is having one person as the seeker and everyone as hiders. Initially, the seeker(s) is given a number to count towards and close their eyes while counting. The hiders then search for places to hide from the seeker. Once the seeker is finished counting, their job is to find where everyone is hiding or admitting that they cannot find all the seekers. Any seekers not found are said to have won, and seekers that are found are said to have lost.

I played this game a number of times in my childhood, but I remember playing it with a friend named Dennis in particular. Dennis had a certain way he played as seeker. While many of us would simply go to places we deemed as “likely” hiding spots in a somewhat random order, Dennis would always begin by looking in one area of the room, making sure that he had searched through every area connected to that area before going to a new area. He continued this process until he either found everybody or concluded that he had searched every spot he could think of and gave up.

It wasn’t until years later that I was able to note the similarity between Dennis’s way of playing hide-and-seek and the Depth-First-Search algorithm. The Depth-First-Search Algorithm is a way of exploring all the nodes in a graph. Similar to hide-and-seek, one could choose to do this in a number of different ways. Depth-First-Search does this by beginning at some node, looking first at one of the neighbors of that node, then looking at one of the neighbors of this new node. If the new node does not have any new neighbors, then the algorithm goes to the previous node, looks at the next neighbor of this node and continues from there. Initially all nodes are “unmarked” and the algorithm proceeds by marking nodes as being in one of three states: visited nodes are marked as “visited”; nodes that we’ve marked to visit, but have not visited yet are marked “to-visit”; and unmarked nodes that have not been marked or visited are “unvisited”.

Consider a bedroom with the following possible hiding locations: (1) Under Bed, (2) Behind Cabinet, (3) In Closet, (4) Under Clothes, (5) Behind Curtains, (6) Behind Bookshelf, and (7) Under Desk. We can visualize how the bedroom is arranged as a graph and then use a Breadth First Search algorithm to show how Brent would search the room. Consider the following bedroom arrangement, where we have replaced the names of each item by the number corresponding to that item. Node (0) corresponds to the door, which is where Dennis stands and counts while others hide.

Bedroom Items as a Graph

Now consider how a Breadth First Search would be run on this graph.

Bedroom Items as a Graph Colored by DFS

The colors correspond to the order in which nodes are visited in Depth-First-Search.

The way we read this is that initially Dennis would start at node 0, which is colored in Blue.
While Dennis is at node 0, she notices that nodes 1, 5, and 6 (under bed, behind curtains, and behind bookshelf) are the nearby and have not been checked yet so she places them on the “to visit” list.
Next, Dennis will begin to visit each node on the “to visit” list, and when a node is visited, she labels it as visited. At each location, she also takes note of the other locations she can reach from this location. Below is the order of nodes Dennis visits and how he discovers new locations to visit.

Order Visited Node Queue Adding Distance From Node 0
1 0 6,5,1 0
2 6 5,1 7,3,2 1
3 7 3,2,5,1 2
4 3 2,5,1 2
5 2 5,1 4 2
6 4 5,1 3
7 5 1 1
8 1 1

Here is a link to my Examples page that implements the Depth-First-Search Algorithm on Arbitrary Graphs.

The Breadth-First-Search Algorithm

I remember when I was younger I used to play the game of hide-and-seek a lot. This is a game where a group of people (at least two) separate into a group of hiders and a group of seekers. The most common version of this that I’ve seen is having one person as the seeker and everyone as hiders. Initially, the seeker(s) is given a number to count towards and close their eyes while counting. The hiders then search for places to hide from the seeker. Once the seeker is finished counting, their job is to find where everyone is hiding or admitting that they cannot find all the seekers. Any seekers not found are said to have won, and seekers that are found are said to have lost.

I played this game a number of times in my childhood, but I remember playing it with a friend named Brenda in particular. Brenda had a certain way she played as seeker. While many of us would simply go to places we deemed as “likely” hiding spots in a somewhat random order, Brenda would always take a survey of the room, and no matter where she began searching, she would always make note of the locations close to her starting point and make sure she was able to give them all a look before she looked at locations that were close to the points she deemed close to the starting point. She continued this process until she either found everybody or concluded that she had searched every spot she could think of and gave up.

It wasn’t until years later that I was able to note the similarity between Brenda’s way of playing hide-and-seek and the Breadth-First-Search algorithm. The Breadth-First-Search algorithm is a way of exploring all the nodes in a graph. Similarly to hide-and-seek, one could choose to do this in a number of different ways. Breadth-First-Search does this by beginning at some node, looking first at each of the neighbors of the starting node, then looking at each of the neighbors of the neighbors of the starting node, continuing this process until there are no remaining nodes to visit. Initially all nodes are “unmarked” and the algorithm proceeds by marking nodes as being in one of three stages: visited nodes are marked as “visited”; nodes that we’ve marked to visit, but have not visited yet are marked “to-visit”; and unmakred nodes that have not been marked are “unvisited”.

Consider a bedroom with the following possible hiding locations: (1) Under Bed, (2) Behind Cabinet, (3) In Closet, (4) Under Clothes, (5) Behind Curtains, (6) Behind Bookshelf, and (7) Under Desk. We can visualize how the bedroom is arranged as a graph and then use a Breadth First Search algorithm to show how Brenda would search the room. Consider the following bedroom arrangement, where we have replaced the names of each item by the number corresponding to that item. Node (0) corresponds to the door, which is where Brenda stands and counts while others hide.

Bedroom Items as a Graph

Now consider how a Breadth First Search would be run on this graph.

Bedroom Items as a Graph

The colors correspond to the order in which nodes are visited in Breadth-First-Search.

The way we read this is that initially Brenda would start at node 0, which is colored in Blue.
While Brenda is at node 0, she notices that nodes 1, 5, and 6 (under bed, behind curtains, and behind bookshelf) are the nearby and have not been checked yet so she places them on the “to visit” list.
Next, Brenda will begin to visit each node on the “to visit” list, and when a node is visited, she labels it as visited. At each location, she also takes note of the other locations she can reach from this location. Below is the order of nodes Brenda visits and how she discovers new locations to visit.

Order Visited Node Queue Adding Distance From Node 0
1 0 1, 5, 6 0
2 1 5, 6 2, 4 1
3 5 6, 2, 4 1
4 6 2, 4 3, 7 1
5 2 4, 3, 7 2
6 4 3, 7 2
7 3 7 2
8 7 2

Here is a link to my Examples page that implements the Breadth-First-Search Algorithm on Arbitrary Graphs.