Tag Archives: grid

Magical Squares Game

Whether introduced as children in elementary school, as adults in the workplace, or somewhere in between, the concept of magic squares has fascinated people for centuries; The Wikipedia article has discoveries of magic squares dating back to 650 B.C. in China.

Magic Squares of size n (for n >= 3) are n by n grids where the numbers 1, 2, …, n2 are specially arranged such that the sum of each row, column, and diagonal all sum to the same number. Below are two examples of magic squares of size 3 and 4.

8 3 4
1 5 9
6 2 7
4 1 16 13
15 11 2 6
10 14 7 3
5 8 9 12

Notice first, that in the first square all the numbers 1, 2, 3, .., 9 are used in the square. Likewise, the numbers 1, 2, …, 15, 16 are used in the second square. Second notice that each row, column and diagonal sums to 15 in the first square and 34 in the second square.

I have recently published a puzzle that is based on the concept of magic squares. There are some slight differences though.
– First, instead of using the numbers 1, 2, …, n2 a random set of numbers are generated.
– Second, the rows and columns each have a desired sum that we would like the numbers in the row/column to sum to.

These two changes allow for a puzzle concept to be formulated based on the magic square concept. Users take turns swapping elements until the numbers in each row and column sum to the number in their goal cell, which is located in the last column or row of the grid. Above is an image of a solved puzzle.

Users can determine their progress the numbers in the next-to-last column, which tells the current sum of the numbers in that respective row or column.

To swap two numbers, first click on a cell with one of the two numbers in it. The cell should then turn red. Then click on the cell with the other number in it and the numbers should swap. If you click on the same cell twice no action should take place (except for the cell to turn red and then blank again).

Take a moment to check out the puzzles and let me know what you think.

nonogram

Nonogram Puzzles

A friend introduced me to a type of puzzles called Nonograms and I enjoyed them so much that I wrote a script that automatically generates these puzzles.

Nonograms are grid puzzles based on discovering the hidden pattern based on the clues provided. This hidden pattern is the answer to the question of which cells of this grid should be shaded black, and which ones should be shaded grey. The clues come in the form of lists at the beginning of each row and column. The list represents the sizes and order of the groups of shaded cells in that line. For example, if there is a list with the numbers “4 2″, then it says that the group has 4 shaded cells, then one or more unshaded cell, then two shaded cells. Because 4 becomes before 2 in the list, the 4 shaded cells would become before the 2 shaded cells in the line of the grid. Also there must be at least one unshaded cell in between the groups because if there wasn’t, then the “4 2″ list would actually be a group of 6 shaded cells.

So have fun with these and let me know what you think.

Other Blogs that have covered this topic:
MINIGAMESCLUB

Shade The Cells Puzzle

A friend described this puzzle to me and I enjoyed it so much that I just had to write a script so that I could play it more.

The rules of this puzzle are simple. Cells can be in one of three states:

An UNSHADED (white) cell means that you have not considered this cell yet.
A DARK GREY SHADED cell means that the sum of the dark grey shaded cells in that row and column must equal the number in that cell.
A LIGHT GREY SHADED cell means that the sum of the dark grey shaded cells in all the connected cells must equal the number in that cell.

I Hope you Enjoy